Tag Archives: marketing

Why Indies Do It Wrong

No Audience, No Downloads

So you have a game, and it is perfect. Bugs have been eradicated, user interface is inviting, and graphics are complementary to the game. Now would be a good time for promotion, right? If you think the answer is yes, then you may be a victim of bad game marketing. If you are lost, please allow me to elaborate.

…why is it that developers gamble their project’s entire visibility, and ultimately their chance of success, on a minuscule stint in time?

By natural occurrence in the mobile game market, unless by some odd anomaly, the public’s peak of interest in your game is at the release. Most in-depth metrics (not to mention common sense) point to this revelation as accurate and a truth throughout the industry. So if this is the case, why is it that developers gamble their project’s entire visibility, and ultimately their chance of success, on a minuscule stint in time? A handful of reviews (if you’re lucky) is not a reliable source of publicity, especially if you’re game isn’t the next installment of Zelda. It is not possible to generate sustainable traffic with releasing just one or two installments of press regarding your game. On the contrary, it is also not reliable marketing to create hype at the inception of your project, and then spring a surprise release to few awaiting fans (if there are any at all).

The fact is that more media outlets and social accounts across the globe need content at a faster rate than ever.

All Aboard the Hype Train

After analyzing the roadblocks guarding the popularity of your game, there is only one sustainable way to garner attention. With work and consistency, carefully constructing a fan base and media presence from the start of your game’s creation is the best way to promote. Yes, that’s right. The common misconception about promotion is that you must have a polished, materialized project to show off to a community. In commerce today and now specifically in the game industry, this is a bold-faced fallacy. The fact is that more media outlets and social accounts across the globe need content at a faster rate than ever. So sharing primitive screenshots and icons will begin to build a base on which your game can stand on. Furthermore, once the public’s interest is piqued, it is more than possible to continue to feed information about the product along the development process, and not after it. This is possible without a colossal budget. This is possible without a horde of in-house analysts scrutinizing data for twenty-four hours a day.

Never be afraid to share ideas before they come to fruition, because by that time, it is already too late.

It comes down to a consistent presence throughout creation leading up to the drop. Generally, this creates a brand and a market for your game that will make the launch exponentially less painful and unfulfilling. Never be afraid to share ideas before they come to fruition, because by that time, it is already too late.

Indie Rocketfuel

“Build it and they will come” is the cliche mantra that so many use to summarize the supply-and-demand market in which consumers live in today. But is it true? Will an awaiting audience really throw itself at a product without the proper publicity? The answer is a resounding no. Although this is true, it doesn’t necessarily mean that some products are more marketable than others however, or even that more advertisements correlate to more success. It simply means that nothing, throughout the course of human history, has there ever been an attraction utilized without anybody knowing about the aforesaid attraction. Therefore, all products and services, regardless of target market, should have at least some medium of promotion and advertisement.

Will an awaiting audience really throw itself at a product without the proper publicity?

Mobile games are no exception to these rules and follow the same fundamental principles of PR and consumer interests. In this industry, word-of mouth is a great way of spreading hype to the market. However, for this to be an effective strategy, the mobile app must be discovered by the proper people /group to impact a greater audience. There are many mediums and websites for indie games regarding promotion, however one of the best I’ve stumbled upon has been gamebrew.io.

Lit

In the new age, a game developer is no longer merely a developer, but also a marketer and entrepreneur. Therefore, platforms like gamebrew.io are not helpful, but rather imperative to your success as a game and as a business. Gamebrew.io offers a welcoming home to all games in every stage of development and even release. The forward site focuses on providing developers with services  that are rivaled by none. The founder of Gamebrew.io eloquently proclaims “A good angle for a story is in regards to “talking opportunities”. As I think I have the only website that is designed around that concept. Any time someone uploads an image or video they re-appear on the homepage, giving them more exposure”.

“A good angle for a story is in regards to “talking opportunities”. As I think I have the only website that is designed around that concept. Any time someone uploads an image or video they re-appear on the homepage, giving them more exposure” 

In summary, developers now have to wear many hats in order to succeed in a competitive market, some of which may be foreign to one’s professional background. With that being said, many platforms have popped up attempting to help out indies and their endeavors. Sometimes you just need to look around for the right resources.

Visit Gamebrew.io games stream library here