Why Indies Do It Wrong

No Audience, No Downloads

So you have a game, and it is perfect. Bugs have been eradicated, user interface is inviting, and graphics are complementary to the game. Now would be a good time for promotion, right? If you think the answer is yes, then you may be a victim of bad game marketing. If you are lost, please allow me to elaborate.

…why is it that developers gamble their project’s entire visibility, and ultimately their chance of success, on a minuscule stint in time?

By natural occurrence in the mobile game market, unless by some odd anomaly, the public’s peak of interest in your game is at the release. Most in-depth metrics (not to mention common sense) point to this revelation as accurate and a truth throughout the industry. So if this is the case, why is it that developers gamble their project’s entire visibility, and ultimately their chance of success, on a minuscule stint in time? A handful of reviews (if you’re lucky) is not a reliable source of publicity, especially if you’re game isn’t the next installment of Zelda. It is not possible to generate sustainable traffic with releasing just one or two installments of press regarding your game. On the contrary, it is also not reliable marketing to create hype at the inception of your project, and then spring a surprise release to few awaiting fans (if there are any at all).

The fact is that more media outlets and social accounts across the globe need content at a faster rate than ever.

All Aboard the Hype Train

After analyzing the roadblocks guarding the popularity of your game, there is only one sustainable way to garner attention. With work and consistency, carefully constructing a fan base and media presence from the start of your game’s creation is the best way to promote. Yes, that’s right. The common misconception about promotion is that you must have a polished, materialized project to show off to a community. In commerce today and now specifically in the game industry, this is a bold-faced fallacy. The fact is that more media outlets and social accounts across the globe need content at a faster rate than ever. So sharing primitive screenshots and icons will begin to build a base on which your game can stand on. Furthermore, once the public’s interest is piqued, it is more than possible to continue to feed information about the product along the development process, and not after it. This is possible without a colossal budget. This is possible without a horde of in-house analysts scrutinizing data for twenty-four hours a day.

Never be afraid to share ideas before they come to fruition, because by that time, it is already too late.

It comes down to a consistent presence throughout creation leading up to the drop. Generally, this creates a brand and a market for your game that will make the launch exponentially less painful and unfulfilling. Never be afraid to share ideas before they come to fruition, because by that time, it is already too late.

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